Ticking Time Bomb

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1.  Climatic Trends
Worse case IPCC scenario trajectories on greenhouse gas emissions are being realized with many scientists feeling that the situation could be even worse than is currently being predicted. There is significant deviation from natural variability in many key parameters including sea level rise, mean global surface temperatures, ocean and ice sheet dynamics, ocean acidification and extreme weather events.

2.  Social disruption
Recent observations show that societies are highly vulnerable even to modest levels of climate change and temperatures above +2°C will be difficult to cope with.

3.  Long-term strategy
It is clear that rapid, sustained and effective mitigation is required globally and regionally to avoid "dangerous climate change". Weaker targets for 2020 increase the risk of crossing tipping points which will make the task of hitting 2050 targets much more difficult. Further delay will significantly increase the long-term social and economic costs of mitigation and adaptation.

1.  Climatic Trends
Worse case IPCC scenario trajectories on greenhouse gas emissions are being realized with many scientists feeling that the situation could be even worse than is currently being predicted. There is significant deviation from natural variability in many key parameters including sea level rise, mean global surface temperatures, ocean and ice sheet dynamics, ocean acidification and extreme weather events.

2.  Social disruption
Recent observations show that societies are highly vulnerable even to modest levels of climate change and temperatures above +2°C will be difficult to cope with.

3.  Long-term strategy
It is clear that rapid, sustained and effective mitigation is required globally and regionally to avoid "dangerous climate change". Weaker targets for 2020 increase the risk of crossing tipping points which will make the task of hitting 2050 targets much more difficult. Further delay will significantly increase the long-term social and economic costs of mitigation and adaptation.
 

4.  Equity dimensions
Climate change will impact some countries and regions more than others with many developing countries being at the sharp end. An effective, well funded adaptation safety net is needed to protect the poor and most vulnerable.

5.  Inaction is inexcusable
Business as usual is not an option - we already have many technological, economic and managerial tools available to address climate change but they must be vigorously and widely implemented. As Lord Nicholas Stern pointed out during the conference, many benefits will flow from a switch to a low carbon-based economy. These include sustainable job growth, reduced health and economic costs, and restoration and revitalization of ecosystem services.

6.  Meeting the challenge
In order to achieve societal transformation we must overcome several serious constraints and seize critical opportunities. These include overcoming existing inertia and building on the growing public desire for governments to show strong leadership on this issue, and, among other things, reduce the influence of vested interests that increase emissions and reduce resilience.source:

http://climatecongress.ku.dk/newsroom/congress_key_messages/

 
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